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amandaonwriting:

100 ways to say ‘great’
Buy the Poster: WriteAtHome

amandaonwriting:

100 ways to say ‘great’

Buy the Poster: WriteAtHome

Notes from a Screenreader: Bad Contractors Build Great Characters

nywift:

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Photo via Go Into the Story.

Like badly built houses, when your characters suffer from faults in their very foundation they can get by just fine with good weather. But when conditions turn ugly, their weaknesses begin to show and the drama starts to happen.

To make a…

what is beat mapping? totally okay with you linking me to an article but i can't find anything online that pertains to screenwriting..

Anonymous

writerlyn:

It has a couple of different definitions, actually, so I understand the confusion.  

The definition I was using requires a bit of background info, so even if you, anon, already know it, I’m gonna break it down for anyone else reading.  

Television pilots have a few different stories in each episode.  There’s generally the A story, the B story, and the C story, with the optional D and E story that worms its way in.  For example, there could be the main personal story (A), the work story (B), the family story ©, and the comic runner (D and/or E).  

I break down each of these stories into separate scenes, or beats (or changes of tactics, thats another fun one), and name them.  Like, A0 is generally the teaser, A1 is the first scene with the A story, A2 is the second, etc, etc.  

For the pilot I’m working on right now, I have 7 A beats, 5 B, 4C, 3 D, and 3 E beats.  it’s a meaty pilot. 

So one of my steps in outlining is I write out each of the beats, grouped together in their stories.  I write out a small one line summary of what’s gonna happen in A0, then A1, then A2, and so on and so forth.  I do that for each of the story lines.  

And then I figure out where they intersect, and in what order.  Which means you can switch them around all crazy, see where they make the most sense, see what makes the best dramatic tension, etc etc. 

So it comes out looking something like this:

Teaser: A0

Act 1: B1, C1, A1, D1, A2

Act 2: A2, b2, a3, c2, e1, a4

And so on and so forth. 

So that’s my version of beat mapping when outlining. 

robertpicardos:

sp00ky-spock:

percychekov:

andurile:

it’s almost 2014 already are we still arguing on whether to give female characters the equal amount of screentime on movies as male characters

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#this is both an example of captain kirk being upset by it and of reboot being a flagrant offender

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THIS IS NOT EVEN UP FOR FUCKING DEBATE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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(x)

micdotcom:

Pixar’s 22 rules for perfect storytelling

Follow micdotcom

notesranonymous:

So this should be helpful :}

notesranonymous:

So this should be helpful :}

hopeforthedamned:

I love Ron so much

(Source: best-of-memes)

Be persistent but also be patient.

-

Michael Arndt advice for writers.

I wrote 10 screenplays before I sold Little Miss Sunshine. I thought no, I’m smarter than everyone! But again, there is sort of no substitute for putting the time in. In my case, it’s 100 percent the truth. From the time I seriously decided to be a writer till I sold my first screenplay was 10 years. My one thing: be persistent but also be patient. 

(via inhernature)

Oct 6

I’m defensive about the word perfectionist, because I think it’s bandied around, like when people say edgy. They’re too fucking lazy to actually come up with a real word. Perfectionist is a polite way of saying compulsive. And I don’t think I’m a perfectionist. That’s a term people use who have no idea how movies get made. This is a ballet with no rehearsal. You can’t rehearse a shoot. You have to come in on the day and perform that dance. And there are so many things that can come between you and the intent.

- David Fincher (via tyrannosaurpaddock)

Oct 5

I remember, you know, I started my career on “Sesame Street.” The very beginning of “Sesame Street.” The first year we did a test, in which we asked a bunch of 4-year-old black kids whether they would like to have one of two dolls. One was black and one was white. And the black children chose the white doll. After the show had been on the air for a year, they chose the black doll. Because just because they had seen themselves on this magic box, they had been validated in some way… there’s something about just seeing yourself up there that validates your existence.

-

 

Naomi Foner, screenwriter and director, speaking at the Los Angeles Times Sundance Women Directors’ Roundtable. Full transcript can be found here, it’s well worth a read.

(via nikiaken)

notkatniss:

Gillian Flynn droppin some straight up wisdom

notkatniss:

Gillian Flynn droppin some straight up wisdom

Storytelling is a political act. It’s making sense of the world and ourselves, and like every other kind of sense-making, it’s as political as it is personal and vice-versa. There is no distinction to be made between the political and the personal. Writing of any kind is political. It’s claimsmaking regarding reality and how to interpret it. Because whenever we’re faced with these things, we’re faced with fundamental truths regarding how creation makes and unmakes the world, regarding whose voices are amplified and whose are lost, between who gets to speak and who is literally silenced.

- sunny moraine in 'the politics have always been there' (via swanjolras)

(Source: budoorwaqamal)

officialunitedstates:





The wind was at our backs, the sky was clear, and the oceanic blue stretched infinitely beyond our sights.  Mary and I had the pleasure of the world at our fingertips, and we were apt to enjoy all that could be enjoyed. 
Our vessel pressed on, the sails taut and bold, pushing us down further into the blue.  A white bird above us cawed and circled around.  Mary remarked to me that she wondered if perhaps it aimed to land aboard our ship, but lacked either the courage or the skill to do so.
"Why land when you can fly?" I replied.
At Mary’s request, I ventured down into the cabin to make us some drinks.  The stairs were slippery, but I managed to make my way down with no error. 
As I opened the door, a terrible sound cascaded through my brain. 
"Breach, breach!" I yelled to Mary.  The ship was sinking, and I knew I had to act fast.  Even a small hole could sink the greatest of ships, and our ship was not great. 
I grabbed a bucket and began to clear some of the water, hoping to find the breach.  Mary was still unaccounted for.  Either she had failed to hear me or she was busy above deck.  After a few buckets of water, I realized the futility of what I was doing and dived under to try to find the leak.  I swam further into the cabin, now completely submerged, my mind and eyes racing to find the hole.  I needed air.  I needed air.  The sound of the water gushing in had ceased.  The cabin was full. I gasped.
I could hear a faint sound from the deck above: “Can you put those little ice cubes in my drink, Stephen?  I like them a lot more than the big ones.”

officialunitedstates:

The wind was at our backs, the sky was clear, and the oceanic blue stretched infinitely beyond our sights.  Mary and I had the pleasure of the world at our fingertips, and we were apt to enjoy all that could be enjoyed. 

Our vessel pressed on, the sails taut and bold, pushing us down further into the blue.  A white bird above us cawed and circled around.  Mary remarked to me that she wondered if perhaps it aimed to land aboard our ship, but lacked either the courage or the skill to do so.

"Why land when you can fly?" I replied.

At Mary’s request, I ventured down into the cabin to make us some drinks.  The stairs were slippery, but I managed to make my way down with no error. 

As I opened the door, a terrible sound cascaded through my brain. 

"Breach, breach!" I yelled to Mary.  The ship was sinking, and I knew I had to act fast.  Even a small hole could sink the greatest of ships, and our ship was not great. 

I grabbed a bucket and began to clear some of the water, hoping to find the breach.  Mary was still unaccounted for.  Either she had failed to hear me or she was busy above deck.  After a few buckets of water, I realized the futility of what I was doing and dived under to try to find the leak.  I swam further into the cabin, now completely submerged, my mind and eyes racing to find the hole.  I needed air.  I needed air.  The sound of the water gushing in had ceased.  The cabin was full. I gasped.

I could hear a faint sound from the deck above: “Can you put those little ice cubes in my drink, Stephen?  I like them a lot more than the big ones.”


I am an optimist, ultimately. I’m always looking for the way in which the hopeful story is true and real, and just as real as a downbeat one. There’s a reality to experiencing grace and joy that is just as worthy of exploring as pain.

Greta Gerwig

I am an optimist, ultimately. I’m always looking for the way in which the hopeful story is true and real, and just as real as a downbeat one. There’s a reality to experiencing grace and joy that is just as worthy of exploring as pain.

Greta Gerwig

(Source: michellewilliamss)